Maison Lucien le Moine – Bygone Methods yielding Perfection in Chardonnay

Lucien le Moine

 

The history of Burgundy includes the Citeaux of the Cistercian Monks – a beautiful, fine old Abbey south of Dijon – where wine was fermented on its fine lees in frigid cellars through summer months. The ancient fermentation practices recognized by the Monks of the Cistercian Order during the Middle Ages as well as the practice of selecting specific plots – or Crus – for the production of fine wines were the corner stone for today’s greatest wines of the Cote D’Or. Allowing wines to naturally ferment in barrel on their fine sediment – known as lees – produces beneficial levels of Carbon Dioxide (a natural preservative). This ancient practice allows modern proponents to avoid the overuse of Sulfur Dioxide in the winemaking practice.

 

Meet Mounir Saouma, a Lebanese monk who – along with his wife Rotem Brakir – established what has become the most talked about, Beaune-based micro-negociant in the Burgundy trade today. Mounir’s passion for great Burgundy was born from his work alongside Cistercian Monks not only in Burgundy at the Citeaux, but further blossomed during his time with the Monks while in Israel – where he met Rotem. Through the assistance of the Cistercians, the couple visited Citeaux many times together, and from there a mutual passion for the Cote’s great terroirs and the Cistercian’s vinification practices was ignited.

 

After leaving the order in 1999, Mounir established his micro-negoce with Rotem, naming it Lucien le Moine. Following the practices of old, their first guideline is to work exclusively with 1er and Grand Cru vineyard plots within the Cote D’Or – precisely as the Cistercians deemed appropriate. Taking this practice one step further, each vintage brings a new selection however as Mounir realizes that what makes Genevrieres perfect in 2004 might omit it from selection in 2007. And therein we find the magic that has made this micro-negoce the jewel of the Cote: a selection process to rival the greatest in the region.

 

Each harvest, Mounir visits his friends in Burgundy just after the harvest – when the first pressing has been completed. Once the selections have been made, the juice – jus-wine as it’s known – is placed in the Lucien le Moine barrels for aging. The le Moine barrels add yet another dimension, being from the Jupilles, which provide some of the most consistently tight-grained oak of any French forest. Toasted to the le Moine specifications, each barrel in the cellars is ordered precisely for Mounir, and Jupilles makes up 100% of the barrel selection Chez le Moine.

 

Once barreled, the juice rests on 100% of its fine lees without racking throughout its entire fermentation process. The wine is encouraged to feed upon these fine lees – through the ancient process of “battonages”, or stirring of the lees – which protects, balances and promotes complexity in the fermenting wine. During this process, the barrels are resting in the le Moine cellars, which are closed, cold, humid and very deep. And thanks to this, the malolactic fermentation process is able to last for many months – another aspect of the winemaking process that leads to exquisitely layered and profoundly flavored wines from Lucien le Moine.

 

Finally, when each barrel announces its readiness for bottling, the le Moine team bottles with respect for the ancient ways: never are their wines fined or filtered. This method allows for the naturally occurring Carbon Dioxide to be present in the finished wines, a natural element that ensures the ability for each of the Lucien le Moine wines to age gracefully for decades. And thanks to this element, Mounir recommends decantation for each of the wines when consuming them young. Each and every element of terroir – from the most sublime nuances of minerality to the brilliance of the Cote’s acidity – combine with the almost indescribable layers of extreme flavor alive in the very grapes themselves, and come together to build a taste sensation that one is not likely soon to ever forget. Tasting these wines is truly vinous perfection!

 

Just how good are they?

 

In the words of Antonio Galloni, when describing the 2010 le Moine White Burgundies, he would say:

 

“Dazzling pretty much sums it up…. This dazzling, drop-dead gorgeous wine is a pure pleasure to taste. Frankly, it is impossible to spit.”

 

And Steven Tanzer – after scoring the top wines here 99 points for 2010, succinctly summarized:

 

“The 2010s here should be extraordinary.”

 

For a complete list of currently available selections, please check out:

 

http://www.jjbuckley.com/search/c~0~st~lucien%20le%20moine%202010

Domaine de la Pousse D’Or – Landanger’s Vision Honors Potel’s Legacy

Pousse D'or

 

Since first showcasing the Landanger wines from Domaine de la Pousse D’Or at my retail shops when the 2002s were released, I have shared this story with hundreds of Burgundy fans. And now that the 2011s are being offered “en premier”, it’s my pleasure to dust off the old pages from deep within this blog for another round…

To tell this story, we go back to 1855, when the original estate, known then as La Bousse d’Or (the golden Earth) was in its first glory days.  At that time, this estate owned a vast amount of land by Burgundy standards.  In its holdings were the entire vineyards of Romanee-Conti and Clos de Tart, two of the most illustrious Grand Crus in the world.  Through the decades, the estate was sold and divided until the 1960s.

That’s when the estate came up for sale once again.  And that time, a man by the name of Jean-Nicolas Ferte’ comes into the picture.  Ferte’ was a man who loved to live.  A man passionate about everything in life that was exquisite, especially great food and outstanding wine.  A man they called a bon viveur.  He had a niece, Florence, who intended to marry.  The man of her intentions?  Gerard Potel.  Ferte’ “adopted” the young couple and set them up in their new abode.

Now you long-timers in this Burgundy business – and my clients who’ve read this tale before – know who Potel is.  He is known the world over as one of the single greatest wine-makers in all of Burgundy.  But before Potel became the Potel, he met Ferte’ and the niece, Florence, in Beaune.  When the three of them came together, Potel was already a wine-maker, but not in Burgundy.  But Ferte’ would drink only Burgundy, so he set out to find an estate to buy so as to complete this picture.  He told all of his richest friends in the Cote D’Or to be on the watch for something suitable.

The man that would contact Ferte’ about the news of the perfect estate would be Mr. Ramonet.  Ramonet sent a letter that the sale was to begin at a certain date but Ferte’, it seems, was on vacation.  The letter never reached Ferte’.  As the date came closer, Mr. Ramonet actually phoned to Ferte’ to announce the news.  This was a moment in history – Ramonet hated using the phone!

The sale was completed by 1964, with about half of the former estate being sold to Ferte’ and his partners.  The name was changed to Pousse D’Or, in accordance with French laws, and Potel was placed in charge of wine-making.  For years, there were partners to deal with.  Ferte’ had formed his partnership with his good friend Louis Seysses, the father of Jacques Seysses, the latter being another of the more famous names of Burgundy, as the wine-maker of Dujac.

Seysses and Potel – WOW that’s a dynamic duo – worked together for a few years at the new Pousse D’Or until 1978 or so when Seysses went full time at Dujac.  But is wasn’t until 1985 after many years of trying to find the “right” group of buyers that Potel finally bought out the shares from that original partnership from the 1960s.  And all through this time, Potel continued to make the greatest wines of the southern part of Burgundy, the Cote de Beaune, at this glorious Domaine de la Pousse D’Or.

Tragically, Gerard Potel died in 1997 and the entire wine world lost one of its greatest stars and most gentle souls.  “His legacy absolutely must be carried on”, was the cry, and one man stepped in to carry the torch.  That man is Patrick Landanger!  He purchased the estate in 1997, invested hundreds of thousands, and hired a new team of professionals from vineyard to cellars.

Landanger is such a perfectionist, such a control freak, that he made the decision to only release the wines that he had complete control over.  That meant he passed over the entire 1997 and 1998 vintages.  His first complete vintage, the 1999s, set not only a new standard for Cote de Beaune wines, but a new standard for Pousse D’Or as well.

And when I tell you – as a long time collector of Burgundy dating back more than 2 decades – that you should very strongly consider these wines for your collection, I do so as a fellow enthusiast; as a man who knows how great a “great” Burgundy can be.  And how rare they are to find….

For a complete list of currently available selections, please visit:

http://www.jjbuckley.com/search/c~0~st~pousse%20or

 

Henri Boillot – From Domaine to Maison; A Perfectionist in Motion

Domaine Henri Boillot

 

Throughout my career in the Burgundy trade – one that spans nearly 3 decades now – I have often been asked the question, “What is it about Burgundy that captures your attention and keeps you so passionate about its wines?” Above all else – I reply – is the fact that when the next generation takes over in Burgundy, there is this palpable sense of change. And it is this change – as the sons and daughters begin managing their parents’ vineyards – that enthralls me, entices me, excites me and keeps me coming back for more.

 

Nowhere else in France have I experienced such vinous revolutions as I do in Burgundy. It’s as if the small families who continue to inhabit, own, manage and operate their centuries old estates and domaines have seen the results of the practices in such faraway places as Bordeaux and Champagne and have made a collective decision to eschew such nonsense. Or perhaps it’s their Cistercian roots; nobly connecting the Burgundians of today to the gentle philosophy of self-sufficiency. Whatever the cause, the results are undeniable; as each generation takes the reins from their forebears, the incoming progeny more times than not seems determined to overwhelmingly impress.

 

As my career has unfolded, I have enjoyed the experience of witnessing firsthand the passing of the baton. I’ve watched (and tasted) as Christophe Perrot Minot has transformed Domaine Perrot Minot. Likewise, my palate has been thrilled with the work at Taupenot Merme, where Romain and his sister Virginie have tenderly coaxed a new level of exquisiteness from their family’s holdings. Others I’ve witnessed include the changes at Comte Liger Belair, Comte Armand, Domaine Magnien, Dujac and so, so, so many more.

 

But perhaps one of my most memorable experiences with the new generation – based solely on the number of vineyard sites (lieu dits) being successfully managed – is the one I continue to enjoy with each new release at Henri Boillot. Whether the wine being tasted emanates from one of the various family-owned plots (Domaine labeled), or is sourced from one of Boillot’s dozens of managed sites (Maison labeled, or simply labeled as Henri Boillot), each example invariably runs to the very top of the score range. Tasting Boillot’s wines from any given lieu dit is a study in just how spectacular that plot of land’s resulting wines are supposed to be.

 

Just about the time yours truly was entering the wine trade (back in the mid 1980s), Henri Boillot struck out on his own to form a negociant business. He had been the winemaker for the family business in the Cote de Beaune – known at that time as Domaine Jean Boillot – for 10 years, but a desire for more expressive and singular wines was burning within him. A negociant business in Burgundy is unique from those in other parts of France in that it allows one to purchase in a host of different forms: land, vines, grapes, juice, must, finished wine, etc. And because Henri desired a palette on which to showcase his art, this new-formed negociant business proved perfect for building a new portfolio. Henri could pick and choose across myriad vineyard sites – buying as he saw fit – rendering wines that mirrored his visions. The world of Burgundy was his.

 

It didn’t take long before Henri’s grandfather – managing director of the family business, Domaine Jean Boillot – became seriously impressed with Henri’s work. So impressed was grandfather in fact, that Henri was beckoned home and restored as the family winemaker. Soon after the turn of the century, Henri – driven by perfection – offered to purchase each of his sibling’s shares in the family domaine. Once complete, the former Domaine Jean Boillot was renamed, christened Domaine Henri Boillot (with the negociant wines continuing with the name of Henri Boillot). This move to rename the domaine was important to Henri in that it identifies his efforts towards perfection while establishing a new label that is distinctly different from his brother’s estate known as Jean-Marc Boillot.

 

Today, with literally dozens of unique lieu dits available, Domaine / Maison Henri Boillot represents one of the most important, impressive and quality driven properties in the entire Cote. The notoriety from international critics certainly supports this position, as comments such as the following have become routine for the man many Burgundy lovers now call the master:

 

“I have heard Henri Boillot described as an iconoclast but in my opinion this is not entirely accurate. Rather, I would describe him as a vigneron who both preaches, and practices, extreme rigor. He believes that there are no shortcuts and that nothing is free. Work properly and seriously and the results will be there.”

Burghound

 

“Henri Boillot decided a few years ago that he wanted to dedicate himself to the production of fine wines. Since then he has gone from strength to strength, sparing no expense, obsessing over every detail, fashioning magnificent wines….Thanks to the superhuman efforts of Henri Boillot, Domaine Boillot should now be counted among the finest producers in the Cote de Beaune for both reds and whites.”

Robert Parker

 

“As a group these wines showed vibrancy, excellent acidity, genuine vineyard character, and they tasted damn good too! Differences between Meursaults from Charmes and Genevrieres were obvious. It was much the same for the Pulignys and the Grand Crus. In every case, the Boillot wines served as excellent representatives of the fundamental character one has come to expect from these vineyards.”

EWS, Wine Advocate

 

For a complete list of currently available selections, please visit:

 

http://www.jjbuckley.com/search/c~0~st~2010%20Henri%20Boillot

 

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Domaine Coste Caumartin – Artistry in Pommard

Jerome Sordet ~ Place over Thumbprint

 

As our intense week of tasting at the Grand Jours de Bourgogne was nearing its end, Friday’s finale was a positively powerful event filled with some of the most structured Pinot Noirs anywhere on earth. We were to experience Pommard in all her glory as we made our way through hundreds of samples spanning every vineyard known, north to south, and in the heart of the appellation. As we entered the Chateau de Pommard, glasses in hand, our final formal event of the tour held promises of surprises to come.

 

The wines of Pommard, as holds true for the balance of Burgundy, offer the taster varying degrees of flavor as well as aromatic profiles depending upon vineyard location. Pommard’s southern reaches – to include Rugiens, Chaponnieres, Fremiers, and Jarolieres – produce wines that are decidedly structured and firm; wines that are quite vinous in their darker fruit components, and that include those earthier notes and deep minerality. To the north of Pommard, the vineyards – to include Arvelets, Grands Epenots, Charmots, Pezerolles, and Coste-Caumartin’s monopole Clos des Boucherottes – are very nearly polar opposites of their neighbors. These northeasterly sites bring a more fruit driven version of Pommard to the table; the structure, while there, is less prominent. It is the cornucopia of assorted Pinot fruits that play the lead role in these Burgundies planted to chalky brown soils.

 

As we moved through the room, it was interesting attempting to discern vineyard typicity from one winemaker’s table to the next. To be certain, there were many a fantastic vigneron in attendance, yet as one sample of Pommard lead to another, I continually found myself seeking more transparency. It became apparent at one point that some had lost sight of place, preferring instead to make their own personal mark on the wines.

 

Then I discovered the table manned by Coste-Caumartin. A family Domaine since 1793, Coste Caumartin is now under the watchful (some say artful) eye of Jerome Sordet. To state that Sordet is a guardian of all that is Burgundy’s history is not an overstatement. Take for example the very land that he owns.

 

Burgundy’s rich, long history is forever linked to the Church. In the Middle Ages, most of Burgundy was owned by the Church. Parts of Volnay belonged to the order of Malta, while other sections were under the ownership of the Priory of Saint-Etienne. And most all who have even a casual knowledge of Burgundy have heard of the famous Dukes of Burgundy. And along with their holdings in Volnay, the Priory of Saint-Etienne also owned parcels in Pommard. These parcels are the very same plots upon which today are planted the vines owned by Jerome Sordet.

 

As Sordet further explains, his Fremiers once belonged to the Abbey de Maizieres, while the family’s monopole vineyard, Clos des Boucherottes, has been owned by the Sordet’s for over a century. These familial treasures explain Jerome’s firm conviction for time tested, traditional wine-making routines. Never will one experience mechanical harvests Chez Coste Caumartin, every single grape is harvested by hand and then sorted again by hand once in the winery. The wines are pressed by foot – as in the ways of his grandfather, Jerome explains – and only a maximum of 15% new wood is ever employed. These are classically structured wines, built for ageing, that are a joy to taste throughout their development.

 

And I (for one) am so pleased that this family is dedicated to terroir and place, rather than a personal thumbprint on their wines.

Domaine Michel Magnien ~ The Gateway to Burgundy

Fourth & Fifth Generation Perfectionists in Morey St Denis.

 

My first encounter with Frederic – Freddy – Magnien (5th generation winemaker for both the Domaine as well as Negoce side of the family business) was over breakfast back in 2007. It was the morning preceding one of his annual wine-maker tours – this one held in Los Angelas – and he, my wife, and then 1 year old daughter and I were all seated together at the hotel restaurant downstairs. As he fed my daughter the ripest blue berries we’ve ever tasted, I was struck by how humble, kind and tremendously gentle and classy he was. That memory remains with me and is the first image I have every time I visit with him to taste his wines – wines that mirror the man: honest, pure, humble and very, very classy.

 

Spanning numerous lieu dits, there are two distinct labels Chez Magnien – both managed by Freddie. On the Domaine side, identified by the striking black labels, are the vineyards owned by Frederic’s father – those denoted as the Michel Magnien wines. For the Negoce wines – also managed by Freddie (from bud-break to bottling, which is quite unique for a negociant business) – are the white-label-identified Frederic Magnien wines. Towards producing wines that capture the purity of fruit and expressive transparency of terroir that has been the hallmark of the Magnien lines since estate bottling began (in 1994), Michel continues as vineyard manager for the Domaine parcels while Freddie manages 100% of the cellar work for all of the wines – Domaine AND Negoce.

 

Freddie Magnien joined his father in the early 1990s at a time when Michel was still selling most of the family’s harvest to local negociants. Freddie recognized his father’s unmatched vineyard work and slowly convinced him to allow Freddie to estate bottle small portions of selected harvests. The Magniens own plots in the Cote D’Or’s most hallowed Grand Crus – with vines in their Charmes Chambertin approaching 100 years in age – and Freddie was convinced that if he could convert his father from selling to bottling that he could expand the family business.

 

As Freddie’s efforts began to be recognized – first by his father and then very quickly by the international wine writers – Michel offered Freddie a golden opportunity. Not only would Freddie be allowed the position of cellar master for the Domaine wines, but he would likewise begin a negociant business to augment the family’s holdings. Adding to the 100 year old plots in Charmes Chambertin, the perfectly situated parcels of Clos de la Roche and Clos Saint Denis, as well as the perfectly tended old vine 1er Cru vines in Morey and Chambolle, Freddie would add to the line up additional lieu dits in practically every appellation throughout the Cote.

 

But it would remain the Domaine wines – these Michel Magnien wines – that would continue as the jewel in the family crown. As grand as the additional bottlings from the Negoce line would prove to be – and they certainly are; just ask Burghound – these profound Domaine wines somehow seem to receive that extra bit of attention from critics and collectors alike. Simply put, when asked why a Burgundy lover would spend their hard-earned dollar on a Michel Magnien wine (be they new to the game or a seasoned “Pinot-phile”), the answer is that Freddie Magnien is one of the most expressive people you’ll ever meet. And his wines – in particular the Domaine wines that he makes with his father – are the most expressive of their respective terroirs that one is likely to experience.

 

Combining his father’s perfectionism in the vineyard – up before dawn to prune and tend – with Freddie’s meticulous nature in the cellar has resulted in a line-up of wines that earned this duo “Wine Personality of the Year” (from the Wine Advocate) in just their second year as estate bottlers.  Add to that numerous years of mid to upper nineties ratings from wine critics across the globe and you’ll begin to understand why so many consider the Magnien wines “the gateway to Burgundy”.

For more information regarding currently available selections, please visit:

 

http://www.jjbuckley.com/search/c~0~st~michel%20magnien

 

(most items currently on sale up to 50% off, contact a private sales rep for details)

 

Cheers!

Christopher

Domaine Denis Mortet – Describing a Master…

Laurence et Arnaud Mortet (courtesy – domaine-denis-mortet.fr)

 

The story of Domaine Denis Mortet is not a long one. It does not begin in some 19th century castle in the ruins of an old family vineyard. And it continues today only because of the will of one very strong widow. And an incredible son…

Clive Coates MW, in his book entitled Cote D’Or, chronicled the Mortet story in a Domaine Profile. That Profile told us all the first tale of Mortet. Clive only produced his “Domaine Profiles” on the very best Domaines for that book. By limiting these reports to the top 60 or so Domaines in all of Burgundy – out of the thousands in existence – Clive set out to establish a “hit list” of the most desirable Domaines of our time. That list still stands as a guide for serious Burgundy connoisseurs in search of the very best.

Domaine Mortet began with 1ha of vines, owned by Denis Mortet’s father, Charles. Charles had no interest in the wine business, so he left the vines to be farmed by others until 1977 when Denis came to work with him at the age of 21. When Denis’ brother joined the team later, in 1982, a company was formed. From the time Denis joined his father until 1982, Denis had worked to increase the family holdings through rental agreements and small purchases. So, by 1982, the family company now had grown to include a total of 8ha, just about 18 acres and by 1984, they were bottling on their own.

Now, while the company may have been young, Denis Mortet had set about to secure contracts on vineyards which were quite old. Of that he was very proud. Denis was an incredible perfectionist – something that would finally, many say, be his undoing. He also went about learning the ways of wine-making from Henri Jayer, of whom Clive wrote, “The history of present-day Burgundy could not be written without him.” Indeed, Mortet knew exactly where he was going!

Domaine Denis Mortet was first exported in 1984 and by 1985, Clive Coates first tasted and reported on them. A star was born! All Denis needed was more land.

His wish came true. Around 1993 or so, a famous land owner, with parcels in some of the most prestigious Crus in Burgundy decided to retire. His name was Guyot and he had watched Denis for a few years, becoming more and more impressed with the care Denis took in the vineyards and the incredible wines coming out of the cellars. He asked Denis if Denis would like to take over the Guyot estate. With one gesture, the Domaine Denis Mortet became what we see today – nearly 30 acres.

Clive Coates described Denis Mortet, saying,

“Denis Mortet is a man of passion as well as perfectionism. Touring round his vineyard parcels shows quite plainly his commitment. You feel he knows every single vine personally. And the wines, full, generous, multi-dimensional, rich and expansive, have a lot more to them than most. This is a splendid domaine. And the wines are getting better and better.”
Clive Coates, MW, Cote D’Or, 1997

further, Remington Norman, in his book on Burgundy, added,

“The quality of the wines is remarkable. From the first skirmish with the Bourgogne Rouge, it is clear that Denis knows the technical skills of wine-making and has its art at his fingertips. The fact that he works his 8ha mostly alone makes the achievement the more extraordinary. These wines are among the best in the commune and would easily earn their place in a cellar of fine red Burgundy.”
Remington Norman, The Great Domaines of Burgundy, 1993

more recently, Bruce Sanderson of the Wine Spectator added,

“Mortet had become one of Burgundy’s stars in the 14 years since he established Domaine Denis Mortet, focusing on single vineyard wines from 28.5 acres of small plots he owned in the Côte d’Or. Dozens of his wines earned rave reviews, including a Clos de Vougeot 1996 that scored 99 points on Wine Spectator’s 100-point scale and a Chambertin 1998 that scored 98.”
Bruce Sanderson, reporting in the Wine Spectator

finally, Burghound considered Denis,

“Nothing if not intense and he’s an open book when it comes to his wines as he loves to explain every aspect, and in detail, from bud break to the bottle. While it sometimes seems that Mortet is in search of the proverbial magic bullet to make his wines even better, very real progress is being made here even if it isn’t exactly in a straight line…And speaking of impressed, both vintages here are excellent but the 2005s should be excellent.”
Burghound – Allen Meadows

I suppose not a lot more could be added by this author except to say that the wine world truly lost a master when, last January 2006, Denis tragically passed away. His son, Arnaud, had been working alongside the master for two full vintages to include the brilliant 2005s. Denis’ wife, too, had been in the cellars and it is her strong will and faith that have lifted the Domaine and kept the work of her late husband alive for us all to continue to enjoy.

I trust you’ll find this offer comes to you with much respect for this family and their incredible – though short – and famous history…

For more information regarding currently available selections, please visit:

http://www.jjbuckley.com/search/c~0~st~denis%20mortet<<<<

 

All the best in wine and life!
Christopher

 

Domaine Taupenot Merme ~ Haunting, impossibly elegant

Where Mazoyeres is "haunting" ~ Galloni

Where Mazoyeres is “haunting” ~ Galloni

Having heard that we would be visiting the Cote for the annual Grand Jours de Bourgogne, Romain Taupenot-Merme emailed me mid-week to extend a personal invitation to join him at his home to visit the Domaine and taste his 2010s. Considering the reputation that precedes this venerable estate, I made certain our afternoon calendar that day was cleared.

As one exits the RN74 in the village of Morey-Saint-Denis, passing the starred yet very affordable Hotel Tres Girard (my preferred home away from home on many trips to Burgundy), you’ll ascend the one lane road in the direction of Clos de Tart. This tiny road makes a beeline for the greatest collection of hallowed soil not just in this one-horse town, but the entirety of the Cote D’Or. As you approach the Domaine of Clos de Tart, turning either direction along the intersecting route, you’ll be travelling through all of the Grand Crus of Morey Saint Denis.

At the far end of the route is Bonnes Mares, sharing its Cru with Chambolle to the south. Continuing north one next encounters the aforementioned Clos de Tart, followed immediately by Clos de Lambrays. It is here, at the base of this steep hill that we visited the home and Domaine of Romain. Eyeing the vineyards further north, Romain also boasts a view of the final Grand Crus of Morey – Clos Saint Denis and Clos de la Roche. Appropriately, and in keeping with the beauty of the landscape surrounding him, Romain’s home is as stunning as the wines that emanate from the Crus his home is tucked away beneath.

Romain and his Sister, Virginie are the 7th generation to tend the land and oversee the production of wines Chez Taupenot Merme – a family Domaine since the 1700s. Romain described his winemaking philosophy to me during our visit that day (as we tasted his entire line-up of 2010s) as one geared towards more transparency and silkier tannins. He has moved all of the vineyards to organic viticulture and experiments with biodynamics on certain plots. He explained that while certain aspects of viticulture Biodynamique are critical to soil preservation, those same techniques are found in traditional organic viticulture as well, hence his avoidance to rush towards certification.

One thing that struck me the most about Romain’s wines was their purity. These are wines – much like his cousin’s, Christophe Perrot Minot – which truly allow for the typicity of the lieu dit to shine through. Each wine was unique unto itself; completely different from the others in the line-up. Tasting with Romain – a true gentleman’s gentleman – is a study in just how grand the terroirs of Morey truly are. And considering the reviews and comments bestowed upon these treasures by Galloni and Burghound, I am personally thrilled to see these wines available for our clients.

For details on currently available offers from this estate, please visit:

http://www.jjbuckley.com/search/c~0~st~taupenot%20merme%202010<<<<