The Wines of Indian Summer | Libations for a Weary Nation

 

 

 

 

I recall fondly first meeting the intellectual Randall Grahm on a rather warm summer night in the late 1980s as he hosted a group of wine drinkers’ monthly event in Fort Worth Texas. This group, an average age of the membership at that time being, oh, perhaps, 60 or so, known as Les Amis du Vin, cared no more about Randall’s esoteric-ness – vinously or personally – than they did if the wine was made of anything other than Cabernet.

 

Unfortunately for the average Texas wine consumer not much has changed since those days; thankfully for Randall, neither has a lot about him. Texans remain saddled to their big wines with big steaks (I admit, though to a terrific fondness for my home-state’s overwhelming Conservative leaning, tho’); and Randall continues on towards the left: funky, hippy wines with terroir just screaming from within.

 

All of which, perhaps suggests that I’m either a confused soul or a changed man. While I like my politics straight up Ronald Reagan, I prefer my wines a bit more on the Kennedy side.

 

At any rate, these beauties are sublime:

READ ALL ABOUT IT:

 Almost sold out – the wines of Indian summer.

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2009 Les Maître Vignerons de la Presqu’ile de SAINT-TROPEZ Rose’ Cotes de Provence Cuvee Premier (50% Grenache/50%Cinsault)

Summer in Provence

I suppose the one aspect of being a wine shop owner I miss most, aside from all the fabulous new wine discoveries, would have to be the trips I made to France so often. Being the die-hard French wine fan that I am, my first trip to France would not be to focus on the trappings of Paris but to trudge around the damp recesses of Burgundy and the Cote D’Or. From that first trip, I would visit the countryside of France dozens of times – perhaps even up to as many as 25 more visits if I really started counting – all with the intention of discovering every vinous corner of the country I could handle.

As enthralled with the sloping hills of Burgundy as I am, one little sun-coated region of France’s Deep South may be even more a favorite of mine. Nestled in the southeastern corner of France, to include such world renowned cities as Cannes and Nice, France’s Provence region is home to some of the most succulent dry wines you’ll ever experience. White wines from the Clairette and Marsanne grapes will be found under the Cassis appellation (not to be confused with the liqueur of the same name), while the more famous and profoundly robust red wine of Mourvedre will be bottled carrying the Bandol appellation. And while the whites and reds of Provence are thrilling examples of France’s treasures, to be sure, for THIS wine drinker, few drinks can match the pure pleasure of a fine Rose’ from the Cotes de Provence appellation.

The area under production, spanning some 45,000 acres, by anyone’s standard, is huge; finding a Cotes de Provence Rose’ shouldn’t be difficult. Finding one that resembles what the local’s drink – now that’s the real trick. One of my trips to France would see me spending a long week-end in a quaint, very sleepy, one-horse town called Saint-Cyr-sur-Mer. Photos do the view zero justice. And the wines are as pure as everyone always brags: “You know, when we were over there, everything just tasted better.”  But in Saint-Cyr-sur-Mer, from the oysters, to the herbs, to the wine, to the fish, it DOES all taste better.

And the wine we’re now drinking by the case at home reminds me of the Rose’ I drank on that long week-end in Saint-Cyr-sur-Mer. The color is the palest salmon pink. The aromas are of fresh strawberry combined with that almost indescribable saline quality that comes from being so close to the ocean. And the flavors? Wow! Purity of red berry fruit, crisp acidity, strawberry, and a lusciousness that are all matched to a medium- bodied frame; so easily gulp-able pool-side with appetizers, grilled fish/seafood/chicken, or even raw oysters, like you won’t believe.

Les Maitre Vignerons Rose’ is one of those little treasures that I simply stumbled across one afternoon and have been lucky enough to find ample supply of locally. There seems to be no U.S. source on-line, so if you’re interested, drop me a note and I’ll divulge my source (no affiliation as always, I do this for sport).

Cheers!

chambertin@sbcglobal.net